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7 ways to make your dog neighbor-friendly

 

 
Bulldog peeks over fence. Make your dog neighbor-friendly. Listen to their concerns, especially if your dog barks at them nonstop, dig holes, or escapes into their yard.

Make your dog neighbor-friendly. Listen to their concerns, especially if your dog barks at them nonstop, digs holes, or escapes into their yard.

Make your dog neighbor-friendly. Listen to their concerns, especially if your dog barks at them nonstop, dig holes, or escapes into their yard.

Dogs make great companions; that’s why it’s essential to train your dog to be neighbor-friendly. Unfortunately, introducing your pet to neighbors is easier said than done.

But don’t worry! We put together a list of six ways to make your dog neighbor-friendly!

Start slow

When meeting someone for the first time, your dog might be shy, cautious, or overly protective.

These behaviors are no different to humans – we all get that way. Try to go slowly, if your neighbor asks if they can pet your dog. Take your time. Let your dog approach the neighbor.

Urge your neighbor to avoid patting the dog on the top of his head. Most dogs hate that. Instead, pat the dog on his back, gently rub his ears, or rub the dog under his chin. 

Be OK with sniffing

Urge your neighbor to let your dog sniff him. 

Having a keen sense of smell, dogs can recognize people – from their owners to other people their owner frequently contacts.

So, the neighbor doesn’t have to extend their hand for the dog to sniff. All your pet needs is a few minutes in your neighbor’s presence during a friendly conversation for the initial introduction to happen.

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Train your dog

Having a trained dog is essential to make your dog neighbor-friendly. 

Instead of your pet barking at your neighbor, or him/her startling them as they walk by, train your dog not to bark constantly. And whatever you do – NEVER let your dog pounce on a person.

Also, keep track of how your dog is behaving. If you notice a sudden change in your dog’s behavior, make a note of it. Keep in mind that dogs that are old (and may have aches and pains), and those that had recently given birth, tend to act more aggressive. Make sure that you and everyone else around you (or you have frequent contact with) know how your dog is feeling, especially when old or have given birth.

And before you do any disciplining, make sure you visit the vet, so that they can help you spot the reason for any behavioral changes.

Exercise your dog

Exercise does wonders for a dog. It not only keeps your dog healthy, but it also helps reduce stress and anxiety. It also can prevent poor behavior.

Dogs that suffer from anxiety can benefit from eating calming bites or taking a stress-relief supplement.

Many vets will tell you to have your dog exercise between thirty minutes and an hour a day. Dogs have a lot of energy to burn, so be sure to make that time beneficial to them.

Control your dog

As you introduce your dog to the neighbor, let your pet decide when to say hello.

But also make sure your dog is restrained by keeping them on a leash, even if they’re well-behaved.

And if your dog starts to growl, bark, or even try to lunge at the person, stop that behavior immediately. Give your dog the sit command and get him to focus on you. If your dog still acts aggressively, remove him from the situation. You always need to maintain zero-tolerance for aggressive behavior.

Reward good behavior

The best way to keep your pet to be calm during an introduction is when this action is done in a relaxed and neutral setting. Make sure that other external factors (like other dogs or people, including children at play) aren’t significant issues when introducing your dog to others.

Also, you may want to carry a few treats so that when your dog is behaving, you can reward them for it. You can even give a treat to the neighbor so he can reward the dog after a friendly exchange. 

You don’t have to reward your dog only with treats. You should also offer them words of encouragement or positive reinforcement. Like treats, a few positive words like “good boy” or “it’s OK” spoken in a friendly, happy manner can help your dog feel more comfortable about socializing with others.

Keep your dog quiet at night

Nothing’s worse than a barking dog — except maybe a barking dog that keeps you awake at night. Eachnight.com surveyed 1,000 people to determine what noises bothered them most at night. And 54 percent said their neighbor’s pet woke them up more than four times per week. Worse, that disruption cost the person about 36 minutes of sleep. 

Conclusion

Make your dog neighbor-friendly. Listen to their concerns, especially if your dog barks at them nonstop, dig holes, or escapes into their yard. Put in the effort to build a good relationship to keep the neighborhood peaceful.

Beatrix Potter writes for Best Essay Writing Services and Top Custom Writing Services, and tutors online at Top Canadian writing services. As a dog fan, she proudly owns a French bulldog.

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